violence

Violence against women is a global health crisis of epidemic proportions and often a cause and consequence of HIV. Violence and the threat of violence dramatically increase the vulnerability of women and girls to HIV by making it difficult or impossible for women to abstain from sex, to get their partners to be faithful, or to use a condom. 

Violence is also a barrier for women in accessing HIV prevention, care, and treatment services. That is why the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS has made stopping violence against women a top priority.

High rates of violence make women more vulnerable

Growing evidence from around the world shows that a large proportion of women and girls are subjected to violence by family members,acquaintances, and strangers.

  • A multi-country study by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that 59% of women in Ethiopia and 50% in Bangladesh reported sexual violence by an intimate partner; and 34% of women in Brazil and 47% in Tanzania said they had experienced physical violence.
  • A multi-site study by the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) found that almost 40% of Indian women interviewed reported physical violence;26% reported severe physical abuse – of whom half reported being beaten during pregnancy.

Violence against women is a fundamental violation of their human rights and is often fueled by longstanding social and
cultural norms that reinforce its acceptability in society – by both men and women.

  • In Kenya, the 2003 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed 68% of women agreed that a husband would be justified in beating his wife, including if she refused to have sex with him.
  • Reports from a range of nations, including Thailand, South Africa, and New Zealand indicate that between 20 and 44% of men admit that they are violent towards their wives or intimate partners.

Violence against women increases their risk of HIV infection

Numerous studies from around the globe show the growing links between violence against women and HIV. These studies demonstrate that HIV infected women are more likely to have experienced violence, and that women who have experienced violence are at higher risk for HIV.

  • Studies from Rwanda, Tanzania, and South Africa indicate that the risk for HIV among women who have experienced violence may be up to three times higher than among those who have not.
  • A Horizons report found that HIV infected women in Tanzania were significantly more likely to have had a violent partner in their lifetime, and to have experienced physical or sexual violence with their current partner. The report also found that younger HIV-positive women were ten times more likely to have experienced violence than HIV-negative women their age.

Non-exhaustive list of global and regional initiatives to eliminate violence agains women 

Violence against women is a global health crisis of epidemic proportions and often a cause and consequence of HIV. Violence and the threat of violence dramatically increase the vulnerability of women and girls to HIV by making it difficult or impossible for women to abstain from sex, to get their partners to be faithful, or to use a condom. 

Violence is also a barrier for women in accessing HIV prevention, care, and treatment services. That is why the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS has made stopping violence against women a top priority.

High rates of violence make women more vulnerable

Growing evidence from around the world shows that a large proportion of women and girls are subjected to violence by family members,acquaintances, and strangers.

  • A multi-country study by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that 59% of women in Ethiopia and 50% in Bangladesh reported sexual violence by an intimate partner; and 34% of women in Brazil and 47% in Tanzania said they had experienced physical violence.
  • A multi-site study by the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) found that almost 40% of Indian women interviewed reported physical violence;26% reported severe physical abuse – of whom half reported being beaten during pregnancy.

Violence against women is a fundamental violation of their human rights and is often fueled by longstanding social and
cultural norms that reinforce its acceptability in society – by both men and women.

  • In Kenya, the 2003 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed 68% of women agreed that a husband would be justified in beating his wife, including if she refused to have sex with him.
  • Reports from a range of nations, including Thailand, South Africa, and New Zealand indicate that between 20 and 44% of men admit that they are violent towards their wives or intimate partners.

Violence against women increases their risk of HIV infection

Numerous studies from around the globe show the growing links between violence against women and HIV. These studies demonstrate that HIV infected women are more likely to have experienced violence, and that women who have experienced violence are at higher risk for HIV.

  • Studies from Rwanda, Tanzania, and South Africa indicate that the risk for HIV among women who have experienced violence may be up to three times higher than among those who have not.
  • A Horizons report found that HIV infected women in Tanzania were significantly more likely to have had a violent partner in their lifetime, and to have experienced physical or sexual violence with their current partner. The report also found that younger HIV-positive women were ten times more likely to have experienced violence than HIV-negative women their age.

Non-exhaustive list of global and regional initiatives to eliminate violence agains women 

The latest from the GCWA

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